J.F. Willumsen
Pantheon in Rome (Moonlight), 1937
Oil on canvas
78 x 92 cm (30.7 x 36.2 in)

J.F Willumsen
Moloen med San Giorgio, 1930
Oil on canvas
92 x 73 cm (36.2 x 28.7 in)

J.F. Willumsen
Anse Spiller Violin, 1935
Oil on canvas
129 x 90 cm (50.8 x 35.4 in)

Sam Francis
Untitled (Edge), 1964
Ink on paper
81.3 x 58.4 cm (32 x 23 in)

Poul Gernes
Untitled (Panum), 1979-1980
Enamel paint on masonite
244 x 244 cm (96.1 x 96.1 in)

Poul Gernes
Untitled (Panum), 1979
Enamel paint on Masonite
244 x 244 cm (96.1 x 96.1 in)

Poul Gernes
Untitled, 1962
Painted glass, old window frame
54 x 70 cm (21.3 x 27.6 in)
Courtesy of estate

Poul Gernes
Untitled, 1945-46
Oil on canvas
26 x 31 cm (10.2 x 12.2 in)
Courtesy of estate

Paul Housley
Big Yellow Bird, 2013
Oil on found object
77 x 67 cm (30.3 x 26.4 in)

Paul Housley
The Thinker, 2013
Oil on found object
75 x 68 cm (29.5 x 26.8 in)

Paul Housley
HMS Skull, 2013
Oil on found object
45 x 45 cm (17.7 x 17.7 in)

Paul Housley
Sleeping Head, 2013
Oil on found object
60 x 50 cm (23.6 x 19.7 in)

Paul Housley
The Poet, 2013
Oil on found object
63 x 53 cm (24.8 x 20.9 in)

Merlin James
Caracalla Blue, 2001
Acrylic on canvas
63 x 53 cm (24.8 x 20.9 in)

Merlin James
Vitrine, 2008-2009
Wood, acrylic, plastic on canvas
43 x 49 cm (16.9 x 19.3 in)

Merlin James
Signal box, 2004-2007
Acrylic on canvas
36.3 x 57.2 cm (14.3 x 22.5 in)

Merlin James
Bridge, 2010
Wood, metal, nylon, acrylic
87.5 x 107 cm (34.4 x 42.1 in)

Alex Da Corte
Open Window (Cake Stand Hex), 2013
3M reflective adhesive vinyl, rubber, velvet, felt, Jack O Lantern grin, sequin pins, anodized metal frames
144.8 x 144.8 cm (57 x 57 in)

Alex Da Corte
Rosebud (Diamond), 2013
Spandex, velvet, rubber, garland, sequin pins, anodized metal frames
144.8 x 144.8 cm (57 x 57 in)

Alex Da Corte
Solid State (Robbing Peter to PayPal), 2013
Velvet, satin, rubber, sequin pins, counterfeit twenty dollar bill, anodized metal frames
144.8 x 144.8 cm (57 x 57 in)

Alex Da Corte
Bad Girl (Stripes), 2013
Velvet, rubber, sequin pins, gold chain, anodized metal frames
144.8 x 144.8 cm (57 x 57 in)

Ryan Gander
A special work, 2011 by Spencer Anthony, 2011
Acrylic and permanent marker on canvas
107 x 80 cm (42.1 x 31.5 in)

Helen Frik
Comic Life, 2005
Ink, gouache, pencil on paper
88 x 68 cm (34.6 x 26.8 in)

JoseDávila
Daylight found me with no answer, 2013
Steel, enamel paint
550 x 250 x 270 cm (216.5 x 98.4 x 106.3 in)

Martin Creed
Work no. 300, 2003
Materials variable
.5 x 23.5 cm (1.5 x 77.5 ft)
Courtesy of Gavin Brown's Enterprise

The Parergon and The Gutter

Opening Friday 6 December 17:00 - 20:00

December 6 – 31, 2013

Alex Da Corte (US)
Martin Creed (UK)
Jose Dávila (MEX)
Sam Francis (US)
Helen Frik (UK/NL)
Ryan Gander (UK)
Poul Gernes (DK)
Paul Housley (UK)
Merlin James (UK)
J. F. Willumsen (DK)


Dec 6, 2013 - Feb 2, 2014

Opening dec 6, 5-8


This show originally came out of thinking about an essay by Jacques Derrida that I read 20 years ago and didn't understand and a conversation about comic strips which I did. 

The Derrida essay (The Parergon, published in the 1987 volume "The Truth in Painting") argued against Kant's idea of the intrinsic nature of the work of art, a universal value of beauty. In those essays the words Ergon (the work) and Parergon (that which is supplementary to the work, i.e. the frame) are frequently used.  

The Gutter is the gap between two frames in a comic strip. It is in this gap that time and meaning happen. In one frame we see a man walking towards a banana skin. In the next frame we see a man in a hospital bed. It is in the gap between the frames that we understand he slipped, hit his head, got picked up by an ambulance.

This show contains no examples of parergon. The frame is central to these works. It  is inherent to their physicality and meaning, not an afterthought added to protect and display them. The frame in this context can be the revealed structure of a painting, the exhibition architecture and the society around it, or the journey that a sculpture makes through space. The frame can be physical, institutional, or metaphorical. The gallery is the gutter.