Keith Tyson, A Mystery to Myself, installationview

Keith Tyson, A Mystery to Myself, installationview

Keith Tyson, A Mystery to Myself, installationview

Keith Tyson

A Mystery to Myself, 2014

Mixed media scaled up replica of ZX Spectrum Motherboard (detail)

 

Keith Tyson, A Mystery to Myself, installationview

Keith Tyson 

Object With Associative Array, 2014

Permanent ink, cellulos and resin on G.R.P.

 

Keith Tyson, Object With Associative Array (detail), 2014

Keith Tyson 

Object With Associative Array (detail), 2014

Permanent ink, cellulos and resin on G.R.P. 

Keith Tyson
Unnatural portrait, 2014
Mixed Media On Aluminium
78,5 x 63 cm
 
 
Keith Tyson
Unnatural portrait, 2014
mixed media on board
78,5 x 63 cm
 
 
Keith Tyson
Unnatural portrait, 2014
78,5x63 cm
Mixed Media On Aluminium
 
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP Contemporary Grotesque - self hate, 2014
Giclée print
78,5 x 63 cm
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP Hedge Fund Manager, 2014
Giclée print
78,5 x 63 cm
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP April 2010 its time to enjoy.... , 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP Cutting the Gordian Knot, 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm
 
eith Tyson
SWDP Drowning in a teleological, 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP King of Owls, 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm
 
 
Keith Tyson
SWDP Love and pain pay scant, 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm
Keith Tyson
SWDP Low Probability Artmachine -T Rex, 2014
Giclée print
78.5 x 63 cm

Keith Tyson

A Mystery to Myself

August 29 – October 25, 2014

David Risley Gallery is proud to announce a solo show of new work by Keith Tyson.

The first room of the gallery contains Tyson’s installation “A Mystery to Myself,” consisting of a large scale replica of a Sinclair ZX Spectrum motherboard surrounded by a matrix of 57 prints selected from studio wall drawings which Tyson has produced over the last 15 years. Tyson explains:

“I remember that once as a teenager I dissected my computer to try to repair it, and how transfixed I became upon seeing its mysterious hidden architecture inside. I felt like a brain surgeon opening up a skull. I had no real idea how it worked, it looked like a miniature city functioning under its own unique laws and logic. I’d owned it for a year and could program it so I understood something of how the software worked, I could even do a little machine code but ultimately I remained pretty ignorant of how the hardware operated.

Likewise, if I look back at my studio wall drawings and I see the trace of my existence over the years; my moods, my output as an artist, and the events that have occurred both in my own life and in the world in general, I still feel completely unable to explain any of it with any real authority. No matter which language we might use to explore the phenomenon of our existence, be it physics, history, logic or poetry, the central process always seem to remain ungraspable."

A large Nature Painting and several Unnatural Portraits will be shown in the second room, paintings made through a process open to chance. The mixture of pigments and chemicals applied to the paintings aluminium surface are subject to gravity, heat, chemical reaction which render the resulting image. This room will also contain Object with Associative Array, a large amorphous white sculpture covered in Tyson’s handwritten stream of connected consciousness which the artist describes as “an attempt to capture something indeterminate and nebulous with a physical net of language and symbols.”

The exhibition as a whole lets Tyson off his leash and presents the wide ranging themes, techniques and obsessions of this brilliantly polymorphic artist, allowing us to walk around in his head to explore the mystery we all are to ourselves.

Keith Tyson (UK, 1969) has been exhibiting internationally for 20 years. He has held major solo shows at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark; South London Gallery, Tate Gallery, London; De Pont Museum of Contemporary Art, Netherlands; Pace Gallery, NYC / London; Kunsthalle Zurich, Switzerland.

His work is held in significant international collections including, 
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark; Arts Council Collection, London; 
Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Fondation Francois Pinault, Venice; 
Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art, Los Angeles; MOMA, New York; Tate Modern, London; The Henry Moore Institute, Leeds; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; 
The South London Gallery Collection, London; SMAK – Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Belgium; Zabludowicz Collection, London.

He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2002.